Such phenomena are known as connected speech processes and they occur naturally whenever we speak in utterances of more than one syllable. Some words are pronounced differently in isolation than in continuous speech – a phenomenon known as a connected speech process. ‘I don’t speak with a Geordie accent, I speak, like, the Northern accent’: Contact‐induced levelling in the Tyneside vowel system . Skip to the start of Sounds Familiar content. Most connected speech processes in English are unimportant when differentiating between accents - speakers of all accents convert a to a sound in the phrase ten pence, for instance. get, got, let, put, shut) and non-lexical words (e.g. a word-final is pronounced like a sound in a restricted set of common verbs (eg get, got, let, put, shut) and non-lexical words (eg but, lot, not, that, what) or word-internally with words such as getting, letting, putting and matter, when occurs between vowels in a small set of common verbs such as getting and putting and across word boundaries in phrases such as get off and shut up and non-lexical words (eg lot of, what if) and even in extreme cases with the noun matter, as in the phrase what’s the matter with you, the pronoun whatever and the phonologically conjoined phrase got to, ’s a lot of people go there - to the woods, t it through muslin, got all the juice out, and then make us a nice pan of broth out of, uhm, out of marrowbones, zero linking R is not pronounced at a word boundary between vowels, when occurs at the end of a word and preceding a word that starts with a vowel in phrases such as car alarm, four iron and there is, mean, you’re always calling each other and we used to gan in the bar and get drunk, you know, preposition + vowel sound appears as the final consonant in some prepositions preceding a word that starts with a vowel, a word boundary when the prepositions by, to, into and onto (strictly speaking tae, intae and ontae in traditional dialect) precede a word that starts with a vowel, as in put it intiv a tin. The Tiger Who Came to Tea by Judith Kerr: sketches and original artwork, Sean's Red Bike by Petronella Breinburg, illustrated by Errol Lloyd, Unfinished Business: The Fight for Women's Rights, The fight for women’s rights is unfinished business, Get 3 for 2 on all British Library Fiction, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-TtoR-lot-of.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-TtoR-put-it.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-TtoR-what-I.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-zero-linking-R.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-i-used.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-wiv-tap.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-wi-buckets-water.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-unstressed-I-remember.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-unstressed-still-doin-it.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-unstressed-my-cousin-wife.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-unstressed-they-trees-bush.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-unstressed-our-house.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-unstressed-we-friends.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-young-uns.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-vowel-army.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-actually.mp3, https://sounds.bl.uk/resources/learning/soundsfamiliar/case-studies/geordie/connected-speech/geordie-brewery.mp3, Jonnie Robinson is Lead Curator for Spoken English at the British Library. Also very occasionally in broad dialect a sound is substituted for the final consonant in the prepositions in, with and from (strictly speaking frae in traditional dialect), used to get dropped off, off the bus in the mornings, while they went away tiv another job, was half-way up the street to the tap: great, big tap wiv a big ear, the final consonant of some prepositions is deleted preceding a word that starts with a consonant, at a word boundary when the preposition with precedes a word that starts with a consonant, as in wi’ bread and butter, also very occasionally in broad dialect the final consonant is omitted in the prepositions in and from (strictly speaking frae in traditional dialect), and you walked away like that, with your buckets full of water, unstressed personal and possessive pronouns, certain pronouns, when unstressed, are pronounced with a reduced vowel, the personal pronouns, I, they and we and the possessive pronouns my and our (wor in traditional dialect) are pronounced with a long vowel when they receive prominent stress, but are pronounced with an extremely weak vowel when in an unstressed position, remember my childhood well, because when I used to go to the butchers with this shilling, I come back and I could hardly carry all this stuff, used to go with my cousin, my cousin’s wife, ey were trees - they weren’t bushes, they were trees, we had friends around the, we used to say round the corner, when the pronoun one is unstressed and preceded by an adjective it is pronounced with an extremely weak vowel, as in the phrase big ’un, the definite article is pronounced with a reduced vowel preceding a word that starts with a vowel, in most English accents the definite article is pronounced with a relatively strong vowel preceding a word that starts with a vowel, as in the apple, and a weak vowel preceding a word that starts with a consonant, as in the pear - speakers with a Geordie accent frequently use a weak vowel in both cases, ’ve lived here ever since, other than the six years I was in the army during the war, polysyllabic adjectives and nouns ending in <-ly ~ -ry>, the penultimate syllable is frequently deleted in polysyllabic adjectives and nouns ending with the suffix <-ly ~ -ry>, such as family, history, properly and usually, ’ve actually got about seven people that are sleeping rough, say to the lads, ‘I’ve got a pipe leading from the brewery into the office’.

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