Even in tiny villages in the rain forest, men drive motorcycles wearing aviator sunglasses, gold watches and brightly colored polo shirts — yellow, pink or purple — sometimes with the collars turned up.

'l'm going-menh' would be like, 'I've been here all day, and now it's time for me to leave.' (Note: The term doesn't have anything to do with Judaism.

Mix all that up into a linguistic stew, and the result is a version of English that's very hard for Americans to understand.

Even in tiny villages in the rain forest, men drive motorcycles wearing aviator sunglasses, gold watches and brightly colored polo shirts — yellow, pink or purple — sometimes with the collars turned up. Eager to learn a bit of Liberian English while reporting there last month, I asked our translator, Siatta Scott Johnson, to teach us a few words and rules. Liberian conversations are no different: They're filled with flair and aplomb. " Scott Johnson says. "People assume they brought English to Liberia," says linguist John Singler of New York University. For instance, a pleasant conversation would go something like: But if someone is struggling or sad, then they would add "menh" on the end.

Instead, they carefully select fabrics with vibrant patterns and then have tailors sew impeccably fitted frocks.

At first, this version of English was spoken mostly along Liberia's coast, among traders, Singler says.

Small-Small: Little by little or step by step. "But in fact, English was already there — the West African variety, pidgin English.".

Liberians tack extra sounds onto the end of phrases, like "o," "ya" or "menh." A big jue doesn't let others tell her what to do."

My Ne-mo (pronounced like the cartoon fish Nemo): This means, "Don't quote me," Scott Johnson says.

This is a common way to greet people. Turns out Liberian English is pretty fun. Liberia has at least 16 (and perhaps as many as two-dozen or so, depending on where you draw the language line, Singler says).

These sounds help convey the speaker's emotion. Every conversation is filled to the brim with "o's" and "ya's." Eager to learn a bit of Liberian English while reporting there last month, I asked our translator, Siatta Scott Johnson, to teach us a few words and rules.

Liberians like to bluff. Liberia has at least 16 (and perhaps as many as two-dozen or so, depending on where you draw the language line, Singler says).

A big jue doesn't let others tell her what to do." The opposite is quick-quick, Scott Johnson says, which means fast. This is a common way to greet people. Liberia was founded in the early 19th century by freed slaves from America. Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR Siatta Scott Johnson (at right), who has guided NPR journalists through Liberia and its lingo, advises two girls on how best to carry bananas and bread. And don't be shy about using them. Liberians tack extra sounds onto the end of phrases, like "o," "ya" or "menh." For instance, "Liberia is stopping Ebola small-small."

And don't be shy about using them. It comes from the phrase "my name no."

Liberians tack extra sounds onto the end of phrases, like "o," "ya" or "menh."

"Everyone understands when you say tay-tay water," Scott Johnson says. Dialects are linguistic varieties that may differ in pronunciation, vocabulary, spelling and grammar.For the classification of varieties of English only in terms of pronunciation, see regional accents of English.. Dialects can be defined as "sub-forms of languages which are, in general, mutually comprehensible." Sometimes she's married, sometimes not.

Sometimes they borrow clothes to look rich. The word "Sekeleway" ("sekenaway" as mostly called) is a Liberian slang used to describe an independent individual (female in most cases- … During the country's 14-year civil war, which ended a decade ago, people around Liberia were displaced.

", And what about the ubiquitous "Oh, my goodness" in American English? Pem-Pem: A motorcycle. But no matter what, a big jue doesn't depend on a man for her livelihood, Scott Johnson says. Liberian English is quite distinct from British or American usage. Tay-Tay Water (literal translation: "titty water"): This doesn't need much explanation: It's breast milk. ", "Liberian conversations can't happen without a 'menh' or 'o,' " she says. "Everyone understands when you say tay-tay water," Scott Johnson says. A big jue doesn't let others tell her what to do." It became popular after Liberia's civil war, Scott Johnson says: "During the crisis, a few women still had money.

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During the country's 14-year civil war, which ended a decade ago, people around Liberia were displaced.

Elsewhere, people spoke their own tribal languages.

Instead, they carefully select fabrics with vibrant patterns and then have tailors sew impeccably fitted frocks. "It's a phrase used to express a strong emotion. 'Hello-menh' would mean I'm angry at the person arriving. It's friendly and warm.

Even in tiny villages in the rain forest, men drive motorcycles wearing aviator sunglasses, gold watches and brightly colored polo shirts — yellow, pink or purple — sometimes with the collars turned up.

'l'm going-menh' would be like, 'I've been here all day, and now it's time for me to leave.' (Note: The term doesn't have anything to do with Judaism.

Mix all that up into a linguistic stew, and the result is a version of English that's very hard for Americans to understand.

Even in tiny villages in the rain forest, men drive motorcycles wearing aviator sunglasses, gold watches and brightly colored polo shirts — yellow, pink or purple — sometimes with the collars turned up. Eager to learn a bit of Liberian English while reporting there last month, I asked our translator, Siatta Scott Johnson, to teach us a few words and rules. Liberian conversations are no different: They're filled with flair and aplomb. " Scott Johnson says. "People assume they brought English to Liberia," says linguist John Singler of New York University. For instance, a pleasant conversation would go something like: But if someone is struggling or sad, then they would add "menh" on the end.

Instead, they carefully select fabrics with vibrant patterns and then have tailors sew impeccably fitted frocks.

At first, this version of English was spoken mostly along Liberia's coast, among traders, Singler says.

Small-Small: Little by little or step by step. "But in fact, English was already there — the West African variety, pidgin English.".

Liberians tack extra sounds onto the end of phrases, like "o," "ya" or "menh." A big jue doesn't let others tell her what to do."

My Ne-mo (pronounced like the cartoon fish Nemo): This means, "Don't quote me," Scott Johnson says.

This is a common way to greet people. Turns out Liberian English is pretty fun. Liberia has at least 16 (and perhaps as many as two-dozen or so, depending on where you draw the language line, Singler says).

These sounds help convey the speaker's emotion. Every conversation is filled to the brim with "o's" and "ya's." Eager to learn a bit of Liberian English while reporting there last month, I asked our translator, Siatta Scott Johnson, to teach us a few words and rules.

Liberians like to bluff. Liberia has at least 16 (and perhaps as many as two-dozen or so, depending on where you draw the language line, Singler says).

A big jue doesn't let others tell her what to do." The opposite is quick-quick, Scott Johnson says, which means fast. This is a common way to greet people. Liberia was founded in the early 19th century by freed slaves from America. Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR Siatta Scott Johnson (at right), who has guided NPR journalists through Liberia and its lingo, advises two girls on how best to carry bananas and bread. And don't be shy about using them. Liberians tack extra sounds onto the end of phrases, like "o," "ya" or "menh." For instance, "Liberia is stopping Ebola small-small."

And don't be shy about using them. It comes from the phrase "my name no."

Liberians tack extra sounds onto the end of phrases, like "o," "ya" or "menh."

"Everyone understands when you say tay-tay water," Scott Johnson says. Dialects are linguistic varieties that may differ in pronunciation, vocabulary, spelling and grammar.For the classification of varieties of English only in terms of pronunciation, see regional accents of English.. Dialects can be defined as "sub-forms of languages which are, in general, mutually comprehensible." Sometimes she's married, sometimes not.

Sometimes they borrow clothes to look rich. The word "Sekeleway" ("sekenaway" as mostly called) is a Liberian slang used to describe an independent individual (female in most cases- … During the country's 14-year civil war, which ended a decade ago, people around Liberia were displaced.

", And what about the ubiquitous "Oh, my goodness" in American English? Pem-Pem: A motorcycle. But no matter what, a big jue doesn't depend on a man for her livelihood, Scott Johnson says. Liberian English is quite distinct from British or American usage. Tay-Tay Water (literal translation: "titty water"): This doesn't need much explanation: It's breast milk. ", "Liberian conversations can't happen without a 'menh' or 'o,' " she says. "Everyone understands when you say tay-tay water," Scott Johnson says. A big jue doesn't let others tell her what to do." It became popular after Liberia's civil war, Scott Johnson says: "During the crisis, a few women still had money.

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